Did the Nov 1 Storm get your attention? Come to AMS mtg 11/13 at Columbia Univ.

November 13th, Thursday 6:30 p.m. at Columbia University

How well do we understand and can we predict extreme weather associated with extratropical cyclones?

Please distribute this e-mail and/or flyers attached to your colleagues and friends.

Mark Kramer, Chair

New York City/Long Island AMS Chapter

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AMS Hazardous Weather Communication Workshop – Be there for the interaction and discussion – Bring your ideas! Nov 18

Two years after Sandy, workshop focuses on ‘Hazardous Weather Communication’

Updated November 4, 2014 5:00 PM
By PATRICIA KITCHEN patricia.kitchen

As a post-tropical cyclone — not an official hurricane — when it reached Long Island, superstorm Sandy proved to be quite the challenge for those in the weather communication field.

So much so that the National Hurricane Center’s warning system was adjusted last year, allowing hurricane or tropical storm warnings to continue even if a threatening system like Sandy becomes post tropical.

"We need to better communicate that every storm is different and potentially has its own set of surprises," says Brian Colle, professor in the School of Marine and Atmospheric Sciences at Stony Brook University.

To that end, scientists, students, emergency management pros, weather enthusiasts and regular folks are invited to a Nov. 18 "Hazardous Weather Communication" workshop at the New York State Center of Excellence in Wireless and Information Technology at Stony Brook.

Goals include discussing communication gaps and challenges during such "big storm events," generating solutions, and getting answers to questions, he said, such as how many warnings people need to hear or read and from what sources, and the role of interaction between family and friends.

With Sandy no longer a classic hurricane as it approached the area, the hurricane center did not issue warnings, with the strongest alerts the National Weather Service issued being high wind and coastal flood warnings, Colle said.

"We get these sorts of warnings a few times each year, so it is not that alarming to the public," Colle said of the issue, since rectified.

"Feedback from the general audience will be important for this," Colle said.

The program runs from 7 to 9 p.m., with comments from: John Bruckbauer, deputy commissioner of Nassau County’s Office of Emergency Management; Rich Hoffman, News 12 Long Island meteorologist; Jason Tuell, director of the eastern region of the National Weather Service; Edward Schneyer, director of emergency preparedness for Suffolk County; and Christine O’Connell of the Center for Communicating Science at Stony Brook University.

Visitors at 5:30 p.m. can enter the school’s Reality Deck, "a cutting edge display" of computers simulating the minute-by-minute rise of Sandy’s floodwaters around Manhattan and funded by the National Science Foundation, Colle said.

The event, free of charge, is sponsored Stony Brook University, as well as the New York City/Long Island Chapter of the American Meteorological Society and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration’s National Weather Service.

Reservations are required; go to you.stonybrook.edu/itpa/forms/workshop-on-hazardous-weather-communication/

Mark Kramer, Chair

New York City/Long Island AMS Chapter

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Extratropical Cyclones (11/13) and Workshop Mtg. on Hazard Weather Communication (11/18)

Come to our November 13th and 18th Meetings – Register to tour from 5:30 p.m. to 7 p.m. on 11/18 the next generation visualization system that is the Star Wars visualization for the forecaster and decision maker at Stony Brook University. Pizza will be provided for all tour registrants. The Workshop begins at 7 p.m. in the same building.

November 18th – Tuesday evening at Stony Brook University on Long Island: 5-7 p.m. tour (pizza provided with registration) & Workshop on Hazardous Weather Communications. Full details, maps, and full list of panelists including Dr. Jason Tuell, Director National Weather Service, Eastern Region and News 12 Meteorologist, Richard Hoffman are provided below: Join us for this timely and important workshop.

Register at: http://you.stonybrook.edu/itpa/2014/10/02/workshop-on-hazardous-weather-communication/

Before the workshop, attendees can visit the "Reality Deck" in the same building (CEWIT), which is a next-generation visualization system that immerses the forecaster or decision support person into the hazard using hundreds of monitors in a room to give a 3D visualization and zoom-in effect.

Where: Center for Excellence Wireless and Information Technology, Stony Brook University

http://www.cewit.org/contact/Directions.html

November 13th, Thursday evening at Columbia University – How well do we understand and can we predict extreme weather associated with extratropical cyclones?

Please distribute this e-mail and/or flyers attached to your colleagues and friends.

See you there – maybe will be talking about the 1st snowstorm of the fall by then, or will we?

Mark Kramer, Chair

New York City/Long Island AMS Chapter

AMS Mtg-NYC_Wernli_11-13-14.pdf

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AMS Fall Lineup – Oct. 18 (Sat) Conference, Nov. 13 (Th) Seminar Mtg and Nov 18 (Tu) Tour and Workshop

Fall NYC/LI AMS Chapter Lineup

October 18th – Saturday – All day Tri-State Weather Conference – Danbury, Connecticut – Don’t miss out on an excellent line-up of speakers including Paul Kocin, Dr. David Robinson plus NWS speakers and Joe Bastardi. $30 registration fee includes continental breakfast, hot lunch and refreshments. This conference has it all, from hurricanes and tornadoes to blizzards, satellites, models and forecasts. You deserve a relaxing and enjoyable day – join us!

No Yankees, Mets or Boston Red Sox conflicts! Come spend day with others who enjoy discussing meteorology. Register now at: http://www.wcsu.edu/weatherconference/application.asp

The Program lineup http://www.wcsu.edu/weatherconference/

November 13th, Thursday evening at Columbia University – How well do we understand and can we predict extreme weather associated with extratropical cyclones?

November 18th – Tuesday evening at Stony Brook University on Long Island: 5-7 p.m. tour (pizza provided with registration) & Workshop on Hazardous Weather Communications. Full details, maps, and full list of panelists including Dr. Jason Tuell, Director National Weather Service, Eastern Region and News 12 Meteorologist, Richard Hoffman are provided below: Join us for this timely and important workshop.

Register at: http://you.stonybrook.edu/itpa/2014/10/02/workshop-on-hazardous-weather-communication/

Before the workshop, attendees can visit the "Reality Deck" in the same building (CEWIT), which is a next-generation visualization system that immerses the forecaster or decision support person into the hazard using hundreds of monitors in a room to give a 3D visualization and zoom-in effect.

Where: Center for Excellence Wireless and Information Technology, Stony Brook University

http://www.cewit.org/contact/Directions.html

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Conferences and Meetings 10-18 (Sa), 11-13 (Th) & 11/18 (Tu)

The NYC/LI Chapter of the AMS has assembled an outstanding program with something for everyone from Danbury to Stony Brook to Manhattan.

************************************************************************************************************************************************************************************************

Saturday, October 18th

Fifth Tri-State Weather Conference in Danbury, CT. See attached flyer! Don’t miss out on a great day – register now!

Register on-line at: https://www.wcsu.edu/weatherconference/application.asp

Conference updates, directions, etc., are at: http://www.wcsu.edu/weatherconference/

************************************************************************************************************************************************************************************************

No registration required – this is a public event. The meeting will be followed by a food/drink reception.

November 18 (Tuesday) Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, Long Island (More details to follow – Save the Date!)

Reality Deck visit: 5:30-7pm

Workshop/panel discussion: 7-9 pm

What: Workshop on Hazardous Weather Communication

Why: Communication is a vital step in the severe weather warning and decision process. It can be challenging to communicate the threat to emergency managers, the media, and the public given the uncertainties in the forecast, the current generation of tools and products for warning-decision support, the vast number of groups needing the information, and some of the technical terminology and explanations used during the briefings. This workshop will feature a 4-5 person panel from the NOAA-NWS, Journalism/Center for Communicating Science at Stony Brook, news media, and emergency managers to discuss these issues as well as potential solutions. Before the workshop, attendees can visit the "Reality Deck" in the same building (CEWIT), which is a next-generation visualization system that immerses the forecaster or decision support person into the hazard using hundreds of monitors in a room to give a 3D visualization and zoom-in effect.

Where: Center for Excellence Wireless and Information Technology, Stony Brook University

http://www.cewit.org/contact/Directions.html

5th tristate weather conference final.pdf

AMS Mtg-NYC_Wernli_11-13-14.pdf

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NYT – 8-12-14: In the Ocean, Clues to Change

FYI

http://www.nytimes.com/2014/08/12/science/in-the-ocean-clues-to-change.html

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JULY 2014 MONTHLY WEATHER SUMMARY for the NJWO BLOG

JULY 2014 – WX SUMMARY for GAITHERSBURG 2 WNW MARYLAND – – by Kevin Shaw

This

July was a fairly comfortable month, cooler and wetter than normal. The average high
temperature of 84.5° (-2.3°) was the coolest value since 83.3° was recorded back in 2000.
As usual the average min (65.6°) was not comparatively as cool, as it was in fact just 0.1°
below normal. Combining these two values resulted in a monthly mean temperature of
75.1°, which was 1.1° below normal. July 2014 was the 12th wettest ever at 4.56″ (+0.82″)
but with a distinct dry second half of the month as only 0.07″ of rain fell between the 16th
and 31st. The usual hit or miss summer storms were

near-misses

many times during that
last half of the month. One record daily low temperature was set, along with one tied daily
record low with a pair of 58’s on the 18th and 25th. The coolest temperature of the month
on the 30th (54°) did not set or tie a daily record low. And the nicest day of the month with
a high temperature of only 73° did not set a daily record low max as a 68° max back in 2001
still remains the record for the date (29th), which turns out was my 64th birthday. The
wettest day of the month, 1.40″ on the 10th, set the only daily record for calendar day
rainfall. The

nine

days of measurable rainfall this July was 2 days below the long-term
average amount of 11. A hot start to the month yielded two straight days of record high min
temps of 73 on the 1st and 76 on the 2nd. However, no maximum

temperature records
were set this July. There were 5 days with maximum temperatures of 90 or greater,
which is well below the normal July amount of 10.6.

The

maximum monthly barometric pressure extreme of 30.27″ occurred on July 5, one
of the nicest days of the month and the day with the lowest dew point temperature for
the month (50°). The lowest value of 29.60″ occurred at the

end

of the month on the
28th, during a cold frontal passage into the beautiful birthday weather on the 29th
I so enjoyed. In an evening thunderstorm on the 8th I recorded my highest peak
wind gust for July of 27 MPH from the west. The year to date total precipitation
through July 31 was 36.20″, which was 9.92″ above the normal amount at this
point in time in the year.

The

distribution of 8 sunny, 16 partly cloudy and 7 cloudy days was roughly in alignment
with the wetter than normal precipitation amount of 4.56″.

There were no days with fog that I observed and 6 days with thunder. Fog frequency was
well below normal, thunderstorm days were exactly normal. There was no heating degree
days and 312 cooling degree days.

My maximum temperature frequencies included 5 days of 90 or above, 22 days from
80-89, and 4 days from 70-79. On the minimum temperature frequency side of things,
there were 7 days between 50-59, 14 days between 60-69, and 10 days with 70° or above.

The diurnal range average was below normal (18.9° vs the normal 21.1°). The max daily
range of 28.3° on the 6th occurred during our highest barometric pressure readings
of the month, predictably dry as a result and a good cooling opportunity. A rather
unremarkable 12.4° lowest daily temperature range on the 21st and 28th occurred on
generally cloudy days but with no rain. There were 5 days total with diurnal ranges
lower than 15°. There were 4 days with ranges of 25°or more. Mid-summer is not
usually the time period that features diurnal temp range extremes.

July 2014 was a generally nice month with early rains and relatively pleasant temperatures.
I hope we can keep up the pace of low amounts of 90 or greater maximum temperature
readings, with average amounts of thunderstorm days. We

always need the rain, but
with my local neighborhood’s propensity for losing power easily during intense
convective activity, I definitely favor the more gentle rains we have been
getting this summer that we desperately need.

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Front Page New York Times Article on Richard Hendrickson – 84 year Record as NWS Coop Observer

See attached or on line at:

?

Mark Kramer, Chair

New York City/Long Island AMS Chapter

Long Island Weather Observer Sets US Record With 84-Year Streak-8-6-14 front page.pdf

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Save Sat. Oct. 18 to Attend the Fifth Tri-State Weather Conference co-sponsored by NYC/LI AMS Chapter

Saturday, October 18, 2014 will be a memorable day for those who attend the Fifth Tri-State Weather Conference in Danbury, CT at Western Connecticut State University (WSCU).

Sponsored by
WestConn Student Chapter of the AMS, New York City/Long Island Chapter of the AMS, NOAA/National Weather Service/Upton/NYC, NY and NOAA/National Weather Service/Taunton/BOS, MA

Attached is a colored flyer announcing the preliminary program, including speakers and topics that meteorologists and weather enthusiasts will enjoy including:

Paul Kocin (Forecast Operations Branch NOAA/NWS)

Dr. David Robinson (NJ State Climatologist/Rutgers Univ)

Jason Dunion (NOAA Hurricane Research Division)

Joe Bastardi (Weatherbell Analytics LLC) plus many others.

Registration is now open at: https://www.wcsu.edu/weatherconference/application.asp

Conference updates, directions, etc., are at: http://www.wcsu.edu/weatherconference/

The AMS Chapter and WCSU have minimized the cost of registration to $30 which includes breakfast, lunch and refreshment breaks. Please join us at another diverse, yet informative conference with speakers and topics from near and far.

By all means, forward the flyer and/or e-mail to your friends and colleagues. Middle, high, and college students interested in meteorology are encouraged to attend.

Enjoy the rest of the summer and see you all on Saturday, October 18, 2014.

Mark Kramer, Chair

Frank Castelli, Vice-Chair

Jeff Tongue, Secretary – Webmaster

Lisa Bastiaans, Treasurer

New York City/Long Island Chapter of the American Meteorological Society

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Freak Hailstorm Hits Siberian Beach

http://www.bbc.com/news/world-europe-28299459

See the weather acts up overseas too!

Remember to come see the NWS Open House 7/27/14 at Upton, BNL.

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