Stewartsville February 2015 Monthly Summary

Stewartsville Monthly Weather Observation Summary
Feb-15
DAY MAX MIN MEAN PRECIP SNOW SOG COMMENTS
1 37.0 11.0 24.0 0.10 1 4.5 1
2 35.0 14.0 24.5 0.89 3.9 7.5 .75 liquid as of 7 am
3 26.0 10.0 18.0 7
4 36.0 10.0 23.0 7
5 33.0 10.0 21.5 0.04 0.4 7
6 28.0 5.0 16.5 6
7 40.0 10.0 25.0 6
8 42.0 31.0 36.5 5.5
9 33.0 23.0 28.0 0.11 0.4 5 rutgers data problems
10 38.0 24.0 31.0 5
11 36.0 17.0 26.5 5
12 40.0 13.0 26.5 0.04 0.5 5
13 20.0 4.0 12.0 5
14 28.0 4.0 16.0 0.25 3.1 4.5
15 18.0 0.0 9.0 0.01 8
16 20.0 -2.0 9.0 T T 8
17 26.0 11.0 18.5 0.14 3 12
18 32.0 0.0 16.0 T 11
19 21.0 4.0 12.5 T T 10.5
20 17.0 -3.0 7.0 9.5
21 26.0 -3.0 11.5 0.25 3.2 9
22 44.0 25.0 34.5 0.07 0.9 13 4.1 storm total
23 35.0 3.0 19.0 11
24 24.0 -7.0 8.5 11
25 37.0 10.0 23.5 11
26 28.0 16.0 22.0 T T 10.5
27 29.0 13.0 21.0 10.5
28 29.0 4.0 16.5 10.5
1.90 16.40
Extreme High 44.0 Date: 22-Feb Seasonal Snow Total: 37.20
Extreme Low -7.0 Date: 24-Feb
Mean Max: 29.6
Mean Low: 8.9
Mean: 19.2
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Bergenfield February 2015 Summary

Hi,

 

There was record-breaking cold here in Bergenfield, New Jersey. U.S.A. during the month of February. It was the coldest month in my period of observations which began in 1983. I recorded a mean temperature of 22.1°F ( -5.5°C ), 11.5°F below the long-term mean. The lowest temperature of 1°F ( -17.2°C ) was measured on the 24th and established a new daily record. A maximum temperature of 46°F ( 7.8°C ) was recorded 22nd. The month was consistantly cold. There were no extended periods of mild weather. Every day saw morning lows below the freezing point. In fact, 12 days brought minimum temperatures at or below 10°F ( -14,0°C ). Ice conditions in the Hudson River became serious enough by the third week in February that ferry service between Manhattan Island and New Jersey was disrupted.

The total precipitation of 1.89″ ( 48.0mm ) was well below normal. The greatest daily precipitation 0.97″ ( 24.6mm ) occurred on the 2nd. This event also deposited 6.2″ ( 15.8cm ) of snow. Although the total snowfall for the month was just a little above normal, the continous snowcover gave the landscape a monotonously winter-like appearance.

Ten new daily low records were established. The 5.7″ snowfall on the 2nd broke the old mark. An arctic front pushing through the region resulted in record wind gusts from the NW of 39mph( on the 15th ) and 30 mph ( on the 16th ).

 

This month will be remembered for its relentlessly arctic-like chill.

 

Best wishes,

 

Rudy J. Nickmann

www.bergenfield-weather.com DSCN1486 Feb_2015

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Undergrad & Grad Scholarships & Teacher Grants Available -

NWA Student Scholarship/Teacher Grant Applications

The NWA is pleased to announce that applications are now being accepted for the following scholarships: the NWA David Sankey Minority Scholarship in Meteorology; the NWA Dr. Roderick A. Scofield Scholarship in Meteorology; the NWA Broadcast Meteorology Scholarship; and the NWA Ken Reeves Memorial AccuWeather Undergraduate Scholarship in Meteorology. The NWA sincerely thanks all who support and promote our scholarship and grant opportunities.

The NWA awards scholarships and grants to undergraduate and, in some cases, graduate students majoring in meteorology or a related field. To learn more about the eligibility and application process for each, please click on the links below.

The NWA also awards Sol Hirsch Education Fund Grants annually to teachers/educators of grades K–12 to help improve the education of their students, school and/or community in the science of meteorology. Please click on the link below to learn more of the eligibility and application process and previous grant winners.

http://nwas.org/committees/ed_comm/application/index.php

or

Links to NWA Scholarship opportunities: (note – follow us on Facebook and Twitter for announcements on scholarship openings and closings)

the application period for 2015-2016 is OPEN – Closes April 15th
the application period for 2015-2016 is OPEN – Closes May 14th
the application period for 2015-2016 is OPEN – Closes May 14th
the application period for 2015-2016 is OPEN – Closes May 28th
the application period for 2014-2015 is CLOSED – Opens in Aug
the application period for 2014-2015 is CLOSED – Opens in Aug
the application period for 2014-2015 is CLOSED – Opens in Aug

Links to NWA Grant opportunities:

the application period for 2015-2016 is CLOSED – Opens in Feb
the application period for 2015-2016 is CLOSED – Opens in Feb

Courtesy of the New York City/Long Island Chapter of the AMS

Mark Kramer, Chair

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GAITHERSBURG 2 WNW MARYLAND – JANUARY 2015 WEATHER STATION HIGHLIGHTS by Kevin Shaw, NJWO contributing member

January 2015 featured above normal precipitation, about normal snowfall, and slightly
below normal temperatures in my backyard heart of the Bennington community of
northwestern Gaithersburg. As usual the average maximum temperature (38.1°, -2.7°)
was the reason for the average mean temperature being below normal (30.9°, -1.0°)
with the average minimum temperature being a bit above normal (23.7°, +0.7°).

Temperatures all month were mostly around normal with a few really cold days and one
really warm day, when on January 4 I hit 59.1° for our monthly high temperature. The
reading failed to set a daily record. In fact, the only daily record set this month was on
our coldest day on the 8th a few short days later, when I had a 22.6° max temperature
(rounded for my record purposes to 23°) which set a daily low maximum temperature
for the date, surpassing the old record for the date of 27° set back in 1988. Precipitation
was spread out fairly evenly through the month, with the most significant rainfalls occurring
on the 3rd-4th (1.43″), the 12th (0.76″), and the 23rd-24th (1.10″). Those three events
totalled 3.29″ or about 81% of the total 4.05″ for the month. Snow fell on 9 days of the
month, spread out in minor amounts not exceeding 3.1″ in any event (the 6th and 26th-27th).
Once again this normally coldest month of the year had no zero or below minimum temperatures,
a trend that has been predominating since the turn of the century (2000).

The month’s total precipitation amount of 4.05″ ranked as the 9th wettest of 36 in my
period of record (POR). 11 days of measurable precipitation during the month was
about normal for the total amount of days (11.5) through my 36 years of record. The
mean temperature of 30.9° was the 14th coldest in my 36 year POR.

The monthly barometric pressure extremes of 30.72″ on the 11th and 29.50″ on the
24th both occurred during wet patterns, just like last month. The month’s highest peak
wind gust of 28 MPH from the WNW occurred on the 30th during a cold frontal passage.

The

distribution of 10 sunny, 11 partly cloudy and 10 cloudy days corresponded pretty
well with our wetter than normal precipitation amount of 4.05″ (+1.00″).

There was 1057 heating degree days and 0 cooling degree days. There were 6 days with
fog, 2 days of glaze, 2 days with sleet, and 9 days of trace or greater amounts of snow
during the month.

My maximum temperature frequencies included 1 day at 50° or above, 12 days from
40°- 49°, 14 days from 30°- 39° and 4 days between 20°- 29°. On the minimum
temperature frequency side of things, there was 1 day below 10°, 6 days between
10°-19°, 18 days between 20°-29°, and 6 days between 30°-39°. 27 days of freezing
minimum temperatures (32° or below) is just a bit above the long-term normal amount
average of 26.2 days.

The diurnal range average was below normal (14.4° vs the normal 17.8°). The maximum
daily range of 27.8° occurred on the 11th whereas the lowest daily temperature range
of 4.0° occurred on the very next day on the 12th. There were 6 days total with diurnal
ranges lower than 10° while, conversely, only 4 days with ranges of 20°or more, all
occurring before or on the 11th.

January 2015 featured mostly muted maximum and minimum temperatures save for
the one day of 59° on the 4th and a few cold days around the 5th-10th. Precipitation
was spread out fairly evenly throughout the month. Snowfall was also spread fairly
evenly through the month, in several light amounts. February appears to have gotten
off to a colder start, with still good chances for a significant snow over the next
few weeks. Ice coverage in local ponds and streams has dramatically increased over
the early part of February. I will discuss the cold and snow of February in a few
short weeks. Spring is not far away, just a few more weeks of this cold winter weather!

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Online – Free Evening Tornado Forecasting Workshop with Storm Prediction Center’s Rich Thompson for these cold snowy nights

The University of Oklahoma Student Chapter of the AMS (OUSCAMS) is presenting a Tornado Forecasting Workshop with Storm Prediction Center’s Rich Thompson. The series starts this Tuesday (Feb. 3), and runs from 7:30 – 9:00 p.m. CT. They will broadcast the workshops live on YouTube and record them for later viewing on the Chapter’s YouTube site. A flyer and current schedule of events is available below. Visit the OUSCAMS social media sites for more information.

Facebook, Twitter, website

OUSCAMS_TornadoForecastingSeries.jpg

February 3 – Sounding analysis and synoptic meteorology (lifted parcels, Q-G theory, etc.)

February 10 – Severe storm ingredients (low-level moisture and lapse rates)

February 17 – Severe storm ingredients (vertical shear and lift)

March 3 – Supercell and tornado conceptual models (plus composite parameters)

March 10 – Tornado patterns (synoptic and mesoscale)

March 24 – Convective mode forecasting (squall lines vs. discrete cells)

April 7 – Tornado parameter climatology (spatial and temporal distributions of CAPE and shear)

April 14 – Numerical models and statistical techniques (convective schemes and post processing)

April 21 – Real-time forecasting exercise

Mark Kramer, Chair

New York City/Long Island AMS Chapter

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Stony Brook Unv. 2015S seminar schedule W@noon

Stony Brook University spring semester seminar schedule attached.

http://www.noaanews.noaa.gov/stories2015/20150105_supercomputer.html

NOAA announces significant investment in next generation of supercomputers

Increased supercomputing capacity will improve accuracy of weather forecasts

January 5, 2015

Mark Kramer, Chair

New York City/Long Island AMS Chapter

Stony Brook Seminars 2015S schedule.pdf

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40th Northeastern Storm Conference – Registration Now Open! 3/6-8/15

From: McCray, Christopher D. @ LSC [mailto:Christopher.McCray]
Sent: Monday, January 12, 2015 11:52 AM
To: nesc
Subject: 40th Northeastern Storm Conference – Registration Now Open!

Greetings!

Registration is now open for the 40th Anniversary Northeastern Storm Conference, which will be held from 6-8 March 2015 at the Holiday Inn in Saratoga Springs, New York. We have an exciting schedule planned, including keynote presentations by Jim Cantore, Dr. Thomas Bogdan, Dr. Louis Uccellini, and Paul Kocin. More information on the conference can be found on our website.

Please visit www.lyndonams.com/registration for instructions on using our online registration form. Information on booking your hotel room(s) with the Holiday Inn can also be found at that page. The deadline for registration as well as hotel booking at the discounted rate is 6 February 2015. Please register and book as soon as possible, as we are expecting the discounted hotel block to fill up. We strongly suggest paying by credit/debit card. If you must pay by check, checks must be received prior to the conference. Please contact me if you have questions about group/organization invoices.

We continue to accept oral and poster presentation abstracts for the conference through 6 February or until space runs out.Information on submitting these can also be found at www.lyndonams.com/nesc2015.

Please feel free to contact me if you have any questions regarding the conference, registration, or abstract submission. We hope to see you in March to celebrate this important milestone!

Sincerely,

Chris McCray
President, Lyndon State AMS & NWA
Lyndon State College
Christopher.McCray

Forwarded by the NYC/LI Chapter of the AMS

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Call for Papers – 40th Northeastern Storm Conference -3/6-8/15 – Saratoga

Subject: Call for Papers – 40th Northeastern Storm Conference

Paper and poster presentation abstracts are now being accepted for the 40th Anniversary Northeastern Storm Conference, which will take place from 6-8 March 2015 at the Holiday Inn in Saratoga Springs, New York. For more information, please see the attached Call for Papers. Feel free to share this with any of your colleagues who may be interested in presenting or attending.

To submit, visit our website at www.lyndonams.com/nesc15 and click Abstract Submission, where you will find instructions on submitting using our online form.

If you have any questions, feel free to contact me at the information below.

Sincerely,

Christopher McCray
President, Lyndon State AMS & NWA
Tel.: 413.813.9440
Christopher.McCray

Sent by the New York City/LI Chapter of the AMS

Mark Kramer, Chair

40thNESC_CallForPapers.pdf

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Did the Nov 1 Storm get your attention? Come to AMS mtg 11/13 at Columbia Univ.

November 13th, Thursday 6:30 p.m. at Columbia University

How well do we understand and can we predict extreme weather associated with extratropical cyclones?

Please distribute this e-mail and/or flyers attached to your colleagues and friends.

Mark Kramer, Chair

New York City/Long Island AMS Chapter

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AMS Hazardous Weather Communication Workshop – Be there for the interaction and discussion – Bring your ideas! Nov 18

Two years after Sandy, workshop focuses on ‘Hazardous Weather Communication’

Updated November 4, 2014 5:00 PM
By PATRICIA KITCHEN patricia.kitchen

As a post-tropical cyclone — not an official hurricane — when it reached Long Island, superstorm Sandy proved to be quite the challenge for those in the weather communication field.

So much so that the National Hurricane Center’s warning system was adjusted last year, allowing hurricane or tropical storm warnings to continue even if a threatening system like Sandy becomes post tropical.

"We need to better communicate that every storm is different and potentially has its own set of surprises," says Brian Colle, professor in the School of Marine and Atmospheric Sciences at Stony Brook University.

To that end, scientists, students, emergency management pros, weather enthusiasts and regular folks are invited to a Nov. 18 "Hazardous Weather Communication" workshop at the New York State Center of Excellence in Wireless and Information Technology at Stony Brook.

Goals include discussing communication gaps and challenges during such "big storm events," generating solutions, and getting answers to questions, he said, such as how many warnings people need to hear or read and from what sources, and the role of interaction between family and friends.

With Sandy no longer a classic hurricane as it approached the area, the hurricane center did not issue warnings, with the strongest alerts the National Weather Service issued being high wind and coastal flood warnings, Colle said.

"We get these sorts of warnings a few times each year, so it is not that alarming to the public," Colle said of the issue, since rectified.

"Feedback from the general audience will be important for this," Colle said.

The program runs from 7 to 9 p.m., with comments from: John Bruckbauer, deputy commissioner of Nassau County’s Office of Emergency Management; Rich Hoffman, News 12 Long Island meteorologist; Jason Tuell, director of the eastern region of the National Weather Service; Edward Schneyer, director of emergency preparedness for Suffolk County; and Christine O’Connell of the Center for Communicating Science at Stony Brook University.

Visitors at 5:30 p.m. can enter the school’s Reality Deck, "a cutting edge display" of computers simulating the minute-by-minute rise of Sandy’s floodwaters around Manhattan and funded by the National Science Foundation, Colle said.

The event, free of charge, is sponsored Stony Brook University, as well as the New York City/Long Island Chapter of the American Meteorological Society and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration’s National Weather Service.

Reservations are required; go to you.stonybrook.edu/itpa/forms/workshop-on-hazardous-weather-communication/

Mark Kramer, Chair

New York City/Long Island AMS Chapter

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